Where Should a Highly Sensitive Child Sit in a Classroom?

The start of a new school year generally means new seating arrangements in the classroom and for a highly sensitive child (and their parents!) it can be an additional source of stress. For most children it matters where they sit in school but for a HSC it can make or break that first day back at school – and set the tone for the new school year.

That first morning as a child finds his or her new place in the classroom is a potential minefield – the first stone laid as to how comfortable your child feels in their new classroom.

Where Should a Highly Sensitive Child Sit in a Classroom

Sit in a group with the ‘nosiest’ child of the class and concentration for that HSC needing quiet will be hard to come by.

Sit next to a chatterbox and that introvert HSC will have trouble completing school assignments.

Sit next to the pathways through the class and the movement around a HSC will be distracting.

Sit at the back of the class and the child with a fear of failing can’t easily make contact with the teacher, can’t quickly gain that reassurance they so badly need.

Sit next to a space dedicated for free play, computer work or group activities and the focus is easily taken away from the task in hand.

Sit in the centre of the class and the activity on all sides can feel overwhelming.

Sit under a bright light and a HSC will feel uncomfortable but may not be able to pinpoint why.

Sit near the teacher’s desk and a HSC is party to every discussion that happens between the teacher and her students. Not just distracting but potentially emotionally overwhelming too.

Sit at the back of the classroom and a HSC has a view of the entire class and therefore every movement, interaction and activity therein. Their bucket fills quickly, leaving no space for school work.

Need I go on?

As a parent of a HSC  you need to have a heart for the teacher, who is often also unfamiliar with a group of new children at the start of a school year. A teacher is finding their way through this potential minefield too – experimenting with seating arrangements and groups of children that work well together.  Remember that the goal of the teacher is the same as yours – that your child thrives in school.

Every child is different. Every child blossoms in different conditions and if the place in the classroom allocated to your HSC makes them feel uncomfortable try and get to the bottom of why. Then you can talk to the teacher together to improve the situation. HSCs often do not want to ‘make a fuss’ so you may need to advocate for them.

So where should a HSC sit in a classroom? There isn’t one straight forward one-fits-all answer to that, but it is clear that where a HSC sits in a classroom should be well considered because the consequences can be huge. If your HSC is struggling in school then seating arrangements is certainly one of the things you should look at.

Over to you: Has the seating arrangements in a classroom effected your HSC? Where’s the best position in the classroom for your HSC?

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About Amanda van Mulligen

Mother, writer, author, blogger. I was born in Britain but live in the Netherlands. I have three Dutch sons and a Dutch husband and I blog about Turning Dutch and raising highly sensitive children.
This entry was posted in The What and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to Where Should a Highly Sensitive Child Sit in a Classroom?

  1. A very important topic! Thanks a lot!

    Like

  2. Pingback: How to Help Your Highly Sensitive Child Back to School After the Summer Break | Happy Sensitive Kids

  3. Pingback: The Perfect School for a Highly Sensitive Child | Happy Sensitive Kids

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